Archive for March, 2021

A Career in Agriculture and Forestry

March 8th, 2021

Agriculture is an important field of study. Being the largest sector of Indian economy, it is the prime occupation of a majority of Indians who entirely rely on it for livelihood. Study in agriculture involves a wide range of activities like research, teaching and certain supervisory works which are being done in the field. Forestry constitutes a part of the study in the agricultural science and technology field. It is also a popular academic discipline. Study in forestry encompasses affairs like global warming, deforestation, natural disasters etc.It focuses on the conservation of forests to ensure a healthy Eco system.

Agricultural courses are available at undergraduate and post graduate levels. For undergraduate course, the basic qualification is 10+2 in science with 50 % marks while for post graduation it is a graduate degree with 60% marks. Doctoral studies are also offered in this field.

Agricultural farming is becoming hi- tech now a days. The number of people engaged in agricultural farming are relatively lower though this sector presents opportunities ranging from government, non-profit organizations and private multinational companies. Major career areas in the field are includes: Agricultural Research, Agri – Business, Agricultural journalism etc. Many sub-sectors in agriculture could also offer employment prospects.

Salaries in this sector are good enough. It can be from 7,000 in the beginning to increase upto 20,000. Agricultural scientists normally earn between Rs.18, 000 and 25, 000.

Professionals in the field of forestry can be divided as Forester, Dendrologists, Ethnologists Entomologists: Forest Range Officers etc. who are involved in various kind of works.

To pursue a course in B.Sc in Forestry, the eligibility requirement is Physics, Chemistry and Biology at the intermediate level. Post graduate studies in forestry is available in various disciplines. Even one can opt for diploma courses in forestry.

Professionals in forestry can work in both government and non governmental offices, industries, organizations, or they can take up teaching also. More importantly they can appear in Indian Forest Service exams conducted by Union Public Service Commission every year which is considered as one of the lucrative career option.

Salary at an entry level is around 8,000, after experience it can go upto 26,000, the salaries are varied according to rankwise in this sector.

Many good colleges in India offer Bsc in Agriculture & Forestry course. Interested Students can opt for this course for which the eligibility is 10+2 (P.C.B./P.C.M.) or equivalent with 45% marks

Some of the premier institutes to pursue courses in the field of Agriculture & Forestry
The College of Technology and Engineering Rajasthan
University of Petroleum & Energy Studies (UPES) Uttarakhand
Orissa University Of Agriculture And Technology Orissa
The Indian Institute of Forest Management Madhya Pradesh Forest Research Institute (FRI) Dehradun
Agricultural College and Research Institute (AC & RI) Coimbatore
Association of Fisheries College Maharashtra
The Central Institute of Fisheries Technology (CIFT) Keralathe
Symbiosis Institute of International Business Maharashtra

CEQA – Agriculture and Forestry Resources

March 8th, 2021

The California Natural Resources Agency adopted amendments to Appendix G of the CEQA Guidelines on December 30, 2009. The amendments were effective as of March 18, 2010. The title of this section was changed from “Agriculture Resources” to “Agriculture and Forestry Resources” and two (2) questions pertaining to forest and timberland (Questions c and d) were added. In addition, guidance on where information could be found with respect to forest and timberland resources was added to the “Guide to the CEQA Initial Study Checklist 2010.”

The reasons for revising this section of Appendix G are described below.

According to the California Natural Resources Agency, Final Statement of Reasons for Regulatory Action, December 2009, “The amendments would add several questions addressing forest resources in the section on Agricultural Resources. Forestry questions are appropriately addressed in the Appendix G checklist for several reasons. First, forests and forest resources are directly linked to both GHG emissions and efforts to reduce those emissions. For example, conversion of forests to non-forest uses may result in direct emissions of GHG emissions. (See, e.g., California Energy Commission Baseline GHG Emissions for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California (March, 2004) at p. 19.)

“Such conversion would also remove existing carbon stock (i.e., carbon stored in vegetation), as well as a significant carbon sink (i.e., rather than emitting GHGs, forests remove GHGs from the atmosphere). (Scoping Plan, Appendix C, at p. C-168.) Thus, such conversions are an indication of potential GHG emissions. Changes in forest land or timberland zoning may also ultimately lead to conversions, which could result in GHG emissions, aesthetic impacts, impacts to biological resources and water quality impacts, among others.

“Thus, these additions are reasonably necessary to ensure that lead agencies consider the full range of potential impacts in their initial studies. In the same way that an EIR must address conversion of prime agricultural land or wetlands as part of a project (addressing the whole of the action requires analyzing land clearance in advance of project development), so should it analyze forest removal. Agriculture and Forest Resources deals with project impacts that may affect agricultural land, forest land, and timberland either directly (through removal of such lands by project development) or indirectly (by contributing to factors that result in the conversion of such land to other uses).”